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02/20/08
More About ME
Filed under: General
Posted by: Mae-Ling @ 1:39 pm

Following Alan’s example, here’s another description of my type ENFP written from a first-person perspective:

http://www.bestfittype.com/enfp.html

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02/07/08
Portrait of My Husband
Filed under: General
Posted by: Mae-Ling @ 11:41 pm

Portrait of an ESTJ - Extraverted Sensing Thinking Judging
(Extraverted Thinking with Introverted Sensing)

The Guardian

As an ESTJ, your primary mode of living is focused externally, where you deal with things rationally and logically. Your secondary mode is internal, where you take things in via your five senses in a literal, concrete fashion.

ESTJs live in a world of facts and concrete needs. They live in the present, with their eye constantly scanning their personal environment to make sure that everything is running smoothly and systematically. They honor traditions and laws, and have a clear set of standards and beliefs. They expect the same of others, and have no patience or understanding of individuals who do not value these systems. They value competence and efficiency, and like to see quick results for their efforts.

ESTJs are take-charge people. They have such a clear vision of the way that things should be, that they naturally step into leadership roles. They are self-confident and aggressive. They are extremely talented at devising systems and plans for action, and at being able to see what steps need to be taken to complete a specific task. They can sometimes be very demanding and critical, because they have such strongly held beliefs, and are likely to express themselves without reserve if they feel someone isn’t meeting their standards. But at least their expressions can be taken at face-value, because the ESTJ is extremely straight-forward and honest.

The ESTJ is usually a model citizen, and pillar of the community. He or she takes their commitments seriously, and follows their own standards of “good citizenship” to the letter. ESTJ enjoys interacting with people, and likes to have fun. ESTJs can be very boisterous and fun at social events, especially activities which are focused on the family, community, or work.

The ESTJ needs to watch out for the tendency to be too rigid, and to become overly detail-oriented. Since they put a lot of weight in their own beliefs, it’s important that they remember to value other people’s input and opinions. If they neglect their Feeling side, they may have a problem with fulfilling other’s needs for intimacy, and may unknowingly hurt people’s feelings by applying logic and reason to situations which demand more emotional sensitivity.

When bogged down by stress, an ESTJ often feels isolated from others. They feel as if they are misunderstood and undervalued, and that their efforts are taken for granted. Although normally the ESTJ is very verbal and doesn’t have any problem expressing themselves, when under stress they have a hard time putting their feelings into words and communicating them to others.

ESTJs value security and social order above all else, and feel obligated to do all that they can to enhance and promote these goals. They will mow the lawn, vote, join the PTA, attend home owners association meetings, and generally do anything that they can to promote personal and social security.

The ESTJ puts forth a lot of effort in almost everything that they do. They will do everything that they think should be done in their job, marriage, and community with a good amount of energy. He or she is conscientious, practical, realistic, and dependable. While the ESTJ will dutifully do everything that is important to work towards a particular cause or goal, they might not naturally see or value the importance of goals which are outside of their practical scope. However, if the ESTJ is able to see the relevance of such goals to practical concerns, you can bet that they’ll put every effort into understanding them and incorporating them into their quest for clarity and security.

Jungian functional preference ordering:

Dominant: Extraverted Thinking
Auxiliary: Introverted Sensing
Tertiary: Extraverted Intuition
Inferior: Introverted Feeling

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Portrait of Me
Filed under: General
Posted by: Mae-Ling @ 11:34 pm

I found a desciption of myself on http://www.personalitypage.com/

Portrait of an ENFP - Extraverted iNtuitive Feeling Perceiving
(Extraverted Intuition with Introverted Feeling)

The Inspirer

As an ENFP, your primary mode of living is focused externally, where you take things in primarily via your intuition. Your secondary mode is internal, where you deal with things according to how you feel about them, or how they fit in with your personal value system.

ENFPs are warm, enthusiastic people, typically very bright and full of potential. They live in the world of possibilities, and can become very passionate and excited about things. Their enthusiasm lends them the ability to inspire and motivate others, more so than we see in other types. They can talk their way in or out of anything. They love life, seeing it as a special gift, and strive to make the most out of it.

ENFPs have an unusually broad range of skills and talents. They are good at most things which interest them. Project-oriented, they may go through several different careers during their lifetime. To onlookers, the ENFP may seem directionless and without purpose, but ENFPs are actually quite consistent, in that they have a strong sense of values which they live with throughout their lives. Everything that they do must be in line with their values. An ENFP needs to feel that they are living their lives as their true Self, walking in step with what they believe is right. They see meaning in everything, and are on a continuous quest to adapt their lives and values to achieve inner peace. They’re constantly aware and somewhat fearful of losing touch with themselves. Since emotional excitement is usually an important part of the ENFP’s life, and because they are focused on keeping “centered”, the ENFP is usually an intense individual, with highly evolved values.

An ENFP needs to focus on following through with their projects. This can be a problem area for some of these individuals. Unlike other Extraverted types, ENFPs need time alone to center themselves, and make sure they are moving in a direction which is in sync with their values. ENFPs who remain centered will usually be quite successful at their endeavors. Others may fall into the habit of dropping a project when they become excited about a new possibility, and thus they never achieve the great accomplishments which they are capable of achieving.

Most ENFPs have great people skills. They are genuinely warm and interested in people, and place great importance on their inter-personal relationships. ENFPs almost always have a strong need to be liked. Sometimes, especially at a younger age, an ENFP will tend to be “gushy” and insincere, and generally “overdo” in an effort to win acceptance. However, once an ENFP has learned to balance their need to be true to themselves with their need for acceptance, they excel at bringing out the best in others, and are typically well-liked. They have an exceptional ability to intuitively understand a person after a very short period of time, and use their intuition and flexibility to relate to others on their own level.

Because ENFPs live in the world of exciting possibilities, the details of everyday life are seen as trivial drudgery. They place no importance on detailed, maintenance-type tasks, and will frequently remain oblivous to these types of concerns. When they do have to perform these tasks, they do not enjoy themselves. This is a challenging area of life for most ENFPs, and can be frustrating for ENFP’s family members.

An ENFP who has “gone wrong” may be quite manipulative - and very good it. The gift of gab which they are blessed with makes it naturally easy for them to get what they want. Most ENFPs will not abuse their abilities, because that would not jive with their value systems.

ENFPs sometimes make serious errors in judgment. They have an amazing ability to intuitively perceive the truth about a person or situation, but when they apply judgment to their perception, they may jump to the wrong conclusions.

ENFPs who have not learned to follow through may have a difficult time remaining happy in marital relationships. Always seeing the possibilities of what could be, they may become bored with what actually is. The strong sense of values will keep many ENFPs dedicated to their relationships. However, ENFPs like a little excitement in their lives, and are best matched with individuals who are comfortable with change and new experiences.

Having an ENFP parent can be a fun-filled experience, but may be stressful at times for children with strong Sensing or Judging tendancies. Such children may see the ENFP parent as inconsistent and difficult to understand, as the children are pulled along in the whirlwind life of the ENFP. Sometimes the ENFP will want to be their child’s best friend, and at other times they will play the parental authoritarian. But ENFPs are always consistent in their value systems, which they will impress on their children above all else, along with a basic joy of living.

ENFPs are basically happy people. They may become unhappy when they are confined to strict schedules or mundane tasks. Consequently, ENFPs work best in situations where they have a lot of flexibility, and where they can work with people and ideas. Many go into business for themselves. They have the ability to be quite productive with little supervision, as long as they are excited about what they’re doing.

Because they are so alert and sensitive, constantly scanning their environments, ENFPs often suffer from muscle tension. They have a strong need to be independent, and resist being controlled or labelled. They need to maintain control over themselves, but they do not believe in controlling others. Their dislike of dependence and suppression extends to others as well as to themselves.

ENFPs are charming, ingenuous, risk-taking, sensitive, people-oriented individuals with capabilities ranging across a broad spectrum. They have many gifts which they will use to fulfill themselves and those near them, if they are able to remain centered and master the ability of following through.

Jungian functional preference ordering for ENFP:

Dominant: Extraverted Intuition
Auxiliary: Introverted Feeling
Tertiary: Extraverted Thinking
Inferior: Introverted Sensing

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02/06/08
ENFP vs ESTJ
Filed under: General
Posted by: Mae-Ling @ 11:44 am

According to the Myers Brigg Personality Test, I’m ENFP, and Alan is ESTJ. We only match on one personality type - Extrovert!

The following descriptions are very telling about who we are. In fact, it’s almost eerie how exact they are:

How to Love an ESTJ (how ML is supposed to love AT):

    * Appreciate how dependable and accountable I am.

    * Respect my opinions and listen to my advice.

    * Notice, acknowledge, and thank me for my hard work and dedication to you and our family.

    * Be honest, direct, and specific when discussing problems.

    * Try not to disrupt my routines, and to keep the house orderly.

    * Above all - respect my desire to be in charge and in control as much as possible.

Tips for Communicating with ESTJs:

    * Be assertive and to the point (bottom line it!)

    * Be prepared to support your ideas with logical reasons

    * Appeal to their innate sense of fairness

How to Love an ENFP (how AT is suppose to love ML):

    * Appreciate my creativity, curiosity, and uniqueness.

    * Tell me how much I mean to you and be patient with my need to process how I feel privately before sharing it with you.

    * Re-establish harmony quickly.

    * Support my need to try new experiences and maintain my many friendships.

    * Try not force decisions too quickly, or bug me about being messy.

    * Above all - encourage me to keep growing, changing, and experimenting with life.

Tips for Communicating with ENFPs:

    * Focus on interesting and innovative possibilities and new ways of solving problems

    * Don’t overwhelm them with facts and details

    * Keep things relaxed, warm and flexible

ENFP
The jobs/occupations using both dominant and auxiliary functions are:
Counsellor
Trainer
Designer
Writer/editor

ESTJ
The jobs/occupations using both dominant and auxiliary functions are:
Sales
Scientist/biologist/physicist/chemist
Accountant/auditor/banker/economist
Teacher
Consultant
Computer specialist

ENFP + ESTJ = ACTIVITY

Relations of ACTIVITY between psychological (”personality”) types

These relations are the easiest and quickest to start. Activity partners do not experience any visual difficulties when starting relations which can be surprising to them at the beginning. Partners stimulate each other into activity. Interaction with an Activity partner becomes really satisfying especially if both partners feel a mutual attraction. However, with continuous interaction over a long period comes overactivation which normally results in an overall tiredness of each other (a good example is when you watch a comedy that is so funny that after half the film you do not have the energy to laugh anymore). When this happens Activity partners need a short rest from each other, after which they can enjoy a positive interaction once again. This pattern repeats itself giving these relations an oscillating character. If partners cannot take a break from each other, it can cause negative stimulation to take the place of positive.

Although overall interaction between partners is nice and easy, when it comes to fulfilling everyday duties and matters together, partners usually meet with many problems. Instead of solving the problems, Activity partners tend to give advice to each other on how to solve these problems, often affecting each others weak points. The advice of an Activity partner is always useful as it can strengthen your weakness, but not so much that it will ever become your strength.

The other problem with these relations is that information between Activity partners always needs some adjustments. One partner may think of it as too foggy and not concrete enough, whereas for the other partner it is too unrefined. Collaboration is also difficult, because partners cannot predict each others behaviour and actions in what seem to be ordinary situations. Because of this, partners cannot rely or count on each other in full. Most of the problems that arise during Activity relationships are because one partner is always Perceiving and the other is always Judging, meaning that they live in different life rhythms.

These relations are excellent for leisure, but not for day to day activities. When two Duality pairs gather together (forming a complete Quadrable) they experience a feeling of elation. The reason for this is that when two Duality pairs interact with each other, the two introverts (one from each Duality pair) and the two extroverts (again, one from each Duality pair) interact with each other as relations of Activity. Introverts in relations of Activity become slightly extroverted and more open, whereas two extroverts will often calm down a little.

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02/05/08
Last Cold Day in Shanghai
Filed under: General
Posted by: Mae-Ling @ 1:47 pm

It’s definitely Winter in Shanghai. In fact, this will be a memorable Winter because China has been hit with the worst snow storms. According to news reports the last time China witnessed similiar devastation was perhaps in 1951. Some people still remember. It was snowing in Shanghai all last week. Kyle threw his first snowball. I escaped to Hong Kong first, and then Kyle joined me for a weekend in warm Singapore to visit with his preschool friend Jax Crockett.

I’m back in Shanghai for one day - semi-packed after being on the road for a week - and ready to escape the cold again to sunny California.  I do have to take to heart how lucky we are to have business class air tickets to fly home to see my family (family I JUST saw last month for Christmas) for Chinese New Year. There are hundreds of thousands of migrant workers stuck in Guangdong province because the snow storms prevented them from catching a train home to their provinces. It’s really, really sad. Alan has already donated to two charitable organizations in China.  We hope our ayi Ding Ding can make it home to her province Anhui to see her two children and family.

This is an interesting time for me personally. I will remember the beginning of 2008, almost 10 years since Alan and I got married, as a critical turning point in our relationship. Most of it is too personal to publish on this iTien blog, but I can say that in this past week we learned A LOT about each other.  The truth hurts, but pain helps people grow and become stronger so that’s the hope I hold on to as we weather through this period in our relationship. 

More travelling and visits with people are on the calendar for me!  I’ll try to blog more this year. It’s actually quite relaxing to blog.

Kyle has been a joy to us. We’re also learning more about him day by day.  For starters, he constantly wants to play with us!

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